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Grouper recipes for Baked Grouper, Simmered Grouper, Fried Grouper, Broiled Grouper, Poached Grouper, Smoked Grouper


All Groupers are members of the sea bass family, Serranidae, and are found in tropical and warm temperate waters worldwide. Black and red grouper are the most popular of these. Due to their preferred habitat around coral reefs, groupers are accessible primarily by hook-and-line fishing. They vary in size and weight, but are commonly marketed at 5-20 pounds. The large, white-flaked flesh contains no intramuscular bones. The skin is tough and strongly flavored and should be removed during cleaning. Grouper has also become the choice of people concerned with healthy eating because it is nutritious in addition to being delicious. 4 ounces of uncooked grouper has only 110 calories, 2 grams of fat (none of which is saturated) and only 55 grams of cholesterol. When you add the 23 grams of protein plus calcium and iron, grouper begins to look like the perfect food. Because the grouper meat is so low in fat, some basting may be necessary when grilling, broiling or baking. Grouper is one of the best seafood culinary choices. It can be used in almost any seafood recipe and its unique flavor comes out beautifully with a touch of mild seasoning and fresh herbs.

Grouper recipes:

Grouper, Sea Bass family, Serranidae

Red_Grouper
Groupers are members of the sea bass family, Serranidae, which has over 400 types. Red groupers are found worldwide in warm temperate tropical waters around the coral reefs and rock outcroppings of the coastal shelf. The Serranidae has over 400 varieties which are found around coral reefs and rock outcroppings of the coastal shelf. Due to their preferred habitat, groupers and other family members are accessible by hook-and-line fishing and less vulnerable to trawl fishery.

Groupers: Marbled grouper (Dermatolepis inermis), Yellowedge grouper (Epinephelus flavolimbatus), Goliath grouper (Epinephelus itajara), also known as Jewfish, Blackbass, Esonue Grouper, Giant Seabass, Red grouper (Epinephelus morio), also known as Brown Grouper, Hamlet, and Deer grouper, Misty grouper (Epinephelus mystacinus), also known as Mystic Grouper, Mustache Grouper, Warsaw grouper (Epinephelus nigritus), also known as Giant Grouper, Black Jewfish, Snowy grouper (Epinephelus niveatus), also known as Golden Grouper, Brownie, Nassau grouper (Epinephelus striatus), also known as White Grouper, Bahamas Grouper, Rockfish, Day Grouper, Black grouper (Mycteroperca bonaci), also known as Black Rockfish, Marbled Rockfish, Venezuelan grouper (Mycteroperca cidi), Yellowmouth grouper (Mycteroperca interstitialis), also known as Salmon Rockfish, Gag grouper (Mycteroperca microlepis), also known as Gray Grouper, Grass Grouper, Black Grouper, and Velvet Rockfish, Tiger grouper (Mycteroperca tigris), Yellowfin grouper (Mycteroperca venenosa), also known as Red Rockfish, Spotted Grouper.

Red Grouper and Gag Grouper are the groupers harvested in volume and most readily available in seafood markets.
Red groupers are members of the seabass family, Serranidae, and are found in tropical and warm temperate waters worldwide. It has firm texture, white meat with large flake and a mild flavor. Red Grouper lends itself well to any form of cooking. Because it is a lean fish, some basting is necessary while broiling or baking to keep the flesh moist. The heads are cartilaginous and produce a rich stock base. Poaching, steaming, baking, broiling, sautéing, microwaving are excellent low-fat cooking methods, if you do not add high fat ingredients. The general rule is 10 minutes per inch of thickness, at the thickest part of the fillet or steak, at 400-450 degrees F.
Gag Grouper have gray or light brown body with wavy markings on the side that generally do not form boxes or circles. Edges of fins are bluish. Color deepens to dark brown shortly after removal from water. They considered as an excellent food value with firm white, a little red flesh and it is marketed fresh.

Best Cooking:

Suitable for all methods of cooking. Poaching, steaming, baking, broiling, sautéing, microwaving are excellent low-fat cooking methods, if you do not add high fat ingredients.
Grouper have an excellent taste with white, a little red boneless flesh. Other methods of cooking Grouper are barbecuing, grilling, stewing, frying, deep frying, braising or use in soups.

Buying and Storing Tips:

Remember, the fishmonger's job is to sell fish. Trust is fine, but keep your eyes open. Trust your senses, first of all smell: A fresh fish won't smell fishy. Look at the scales. They should be bright, and colorful. If the fish looks dull it's old. Touch the fish. It should feel firm, not soft, and your fingertip shouldn't leave an impression. Look the fish in the eyes. They should be clear and dark, as if it's looking back at you. No white at all. Check the gills. They should be bright red. Nor should most fish feel or look slimy. Storage: Store whole fish up to 2 days refrigerated.

How to Fillet a Grouper:

Scale the fish if you plan on keeping the skin on. Staring at the tail, run the dull side of your knife backwards along the fish. Scraping the fish in short strokes, taking care to remove all the scales. If you plan on removing the skin, scaling isn’t necessary.
Cut the fish behind the gills down to the backbone. Hold the knife towards the head at an angle to keep the most meat on the fillet.
Slide your knife down along the fish’s spine all the way to the tail. Take care to keep the knife as close to the backbone as possible to not waste any of the meat.
Lay the fillet skin side down on the table. To remove the skin, slide your knife between the meat and skin and work your knife back and forth until you reach the end of the fillet.
Place your knife under the ribs attached to the fillet. Cut the ribs off by sliding your knife under them and cutting them out from top to bottom. Use pliers to remove any remaining rib bones.
Rinse the fillets with clean water to remove any debris. Place them in a freezer bag and freeze if you will be storing them, or cook them immediately to get the most from the freshly filleted Grouper.

Nutrition Value:

The large, white-flaked flesh contains no intramuscular bones. The skin is tough and strongly flavored and should be removed during cleaning. The extra lean white meat is firm and moist with large flake and a sweet, mild flavor. Nutritional Value Per Serving: For approximately 4 ounces (114 grams) of raw, edible portions: Calories 110, Calories From Fat 20, Total Fat 2g, Saturated Fat 0g, Trans Fatty Acid 0, Cholesterol 55mg, Sodium 65mg, Total Carbohydrates 0g, Protein 23g, Omega 3 Fatty Acid 0.26g.



Substitutes for Grouper:

Black Sea Bass, Red Snapper, Striped Bass

Notes:

They are the most important species in the sport and commercial fisheries of the southeast coast of the USA and in the Gulf of Mexico. They are also very common in the recreational fishery. The meat generates a fairly high price and is considered very good quality. They could be caught with hook-and-line and in traps using Drifting, Still Fishing or Trolling and considered best sporting game quality of the Groupers.

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